Under Constant Annoyance~July 1864~7th & 8th

Under Constant Annoyance ~ Union officer in Georgia.

In the Georgia heat Sherman draws ever nearer to Atlanta in plenty of hard fighting. After destroying much of Roswell, Georgia, Sherman orders the deportation of the town’s skilled workers, women as well as men. Grant, as at Vicksburg last year, has his artillery relentlessly pound Petersburg. The increasing bad situation in the prison camp at Andersonville draws attention from officials in Richmond and from Georgia citizens. Lincoln vetoes a bill he considers too harsh on reconstruction in the post-war South. The king of Hawaii exerts his power. Police in Japan disrupt an alleged coup attempt. Rumors about the Confederacy’s plans for Mexico float about in diplomatic circles.

Union General Sherman

Union General Sherman

July 7– Thursday– Richmond, Virginia– “Mary E. Vanderlip and Sarah Jane Rose, were yesterday brought before the Mayor on the charge of keeping a disorderly house of ill fame; and, at the same time, John C. Dawson, J. M. Boykin and Holesforth were charged with being found in the said house. It appeared that Vanderlip and Rose lived in a house in ‘Highland Row,’ on Main street, in Rocketts. The neighbors, complaining very much of the character of the house, officers Adams and Bibb visited it on Tuesday evening, when they found the woman and men behaving themselves in a manner calculated to disturb the peace and quiet of the neighborhood. Mr. Adams stated that the man Dawson was a released Penitentiary convict. Boykin and Holesforth were patients from Chimborazo Hospital. The Mayor sent Dawson and the women to jail, and turned the soldiers over to the Provost Marshal.” ~ Richmond Whig.

July 7– Thursday– Petersburg, Virginia– “It is distressing to see & to know the amount of terrible suffering caused by this useless & wicked bombardment of a place which if burst to the ground would not bring the Yankees one inch nearer to the city or to Richmond. The whole city with the exception of a house here & there is entirely deserted & to walk the silent Streets the foot fall echoes drearily from the houses more or less riddled by the shell which every few minutes comes tearing & plunging through. The citizens are camping in the suburbs & woods around the city old men women & children. I heard through a Major Johnston from Roswell up to the 27th of June at which time Roswell he said was safe. I am very anxious to hear.” ~ Letter from Confederate officer Barrington King to his family in Roswell, Georgia.

July 7– Thursday– above the Chattahoochee River, Georgia– “I am sitting at a table under a fresh, green oak bower . . . as comfortable as one can be in this almost insufferable heat. We came here yesterday afternoon to encamp In the shady woods, with notice that we would be allowed a few days rest. We are . . . on a high ridge, and can see several church spires of the Gate City [Atlanta] from our camp. The enemy has strong fortifications on the north bank of the river and occupies them. I believe, however, that the larger portion of his army is on the south side, and that the works on this side are intended rather as a defense for the crossing. The rest here will do us good; we have had a severe campaign in hot weather Since we first met the enemy at Buzzard Roost two months ago, we have been marching and fighting all the time, and even when we have been in camp, It was so near the enemy’s line as to be under constant annoyance from picket firing and constantly on the alert ready for action, so that the rest ought to be a few weeks rather than a few days.” ~ Letter from Union officer Fredrick C. Winkler to his wife.

July 7– Thursday– Cobb County, Georgia– “I went to town and saw a few friends, heard added statements of depredations and believe but few in the town and county had escaped the visits and terrors of the Robbers. I returned home to suffer from my own reflections upon the sufferings of all and the debasing effects of war and to enjoy some relief from my own thoughts in the society of the pleasant strangers who were encamped about me.” ~ Diary of William King.

Roswell deportees

Roswell deportees

 July 7– Thursday– Roswell, Georgia– Union General Garrard receives orders from General Sherman telling him to “arrest all people, male and female, connected with those factories, no matter what the clamor, and let them foot it, under guard, to Marietta, whence I will send them by [railroad] cars to the North. The poor women will make a howl. Let them take along their children and clothing, provided they have the means of hauling it or you can spare them.” In addition Sherman instructs Garrard that mill owners and employees alike should be charged with treason for providing material aid to the Confederacy.

July 7– Thursday– Kawaiahao, Hawaii– A constitutional convention meets to adopt a new constitution. King Kamehameha V, who ascended the throne last year, in conference with his advisors has drafted a constitution and presents it to the delegates. The members of the convention, however, will be unable to agree on the king’s proposed constitution because of his new voting requirements. Kamehameha will soon grow impatient with the delay, will dissolve the convention and will unilaterally announce that his constitution replaces the 1852 constitution as the law of the land.

King Kamehameha V

King Kamehameha V

July 8– Friday– New London, Connecticut– Birth of Frank B Brandegee, lawyer and Republican politician. [Dies by his own hand October 14, 1924.]

 July 8– Friday– Boston, Massachusetts– Birth of Fred Holland Day, photographer who will work to establish photography as a fine art for. [Dies November 12, 1933.]

Fred Holland Day 1911

Fred Holland Day 1911

July 8– Friday– Washington, D.C.– “Whereas, at the late Session, Congress passed a Bill, ‘To guarantee to certain States, whose governments have been usurped or overthrown, a republican form of Government’, a copy of which is hereunto annexed; And whereas, the said Bill was presented to the President of the United States, for his approval, less than one hour before the sine die adjournment of said Session, and was not signed by him; And whereas, the said Bill contains, among other things, a plan for restoring the States in rebellion to their proper practical relation in the Union, which plan expresses the sense of Congress upon that subject, and which plan it is now thought fit to lay before the people for their consideration; Now, therefore, I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, do proclaim, declare, and make known, that, while I am, (as I was in December last, when by proclamation I propounded a plan for restoration) unprepared, by a formal approval of this Bill, to be inflexibly committed to any single plan of restoration; and, while I am also unprepared to declare, that the free-state constitutions and governments, already adopted and installed in Arkansas and Louisiana, shall be set aside and held for nought, thereby repelling and discouraging the loyal citizens who have set up the same, as to further effort; or to declare a constitutional competency in Congress to abolish slavery in States, but am at the same time sincerely hoping and expecting that a constitutional amendment, abolishing slavery throughout the nation, may be adopted, nevertheless, I am fully satisfied with the system for restoration contained in the Bill, as one very proper plan for the loyal people of any State choosing to adopt it; and that I am, and at all times shall be, prepared to give the Executive aid and assistance to any such people, so soon as the military resistance to the United States shall have been suppressed in any such State, and the people thereof shall have sufficiently returned to their obedience to the Constitution and the laws of the United States,– in which cases, military Governors will be appointed, with directions to proceed according to the Bill.” ~ Message to Congress from President Lincoln, explaining his pocket veto of the Wade-Davis reconstruction bill.

 July 8– Friday– Richmond, Virginia– “Captain H. T. Bowles, for some time back engaged at Castle Thunder, John L. Weatherford, John F. Carter, and John S. Hammond, well known attaches of Captain Maccubin’s detective corps of this city, have received orders to report to General Winder, now commanding the prison post at Andersonville, Georgia. These gentlemen will leave forthwith for their destination.” ~ Richmond Times Dispatch.

graves at Andersonville

graves at Andersonville

July 8– Friday– outside Petersburg, Virginia– “We have just heard of the destruction of the Rebel Steamer Alabama by the Yankee Kearsage. Hurrah!” ~ Diary of Union officer Elisha Hunt Rhodes.

 July 8– Friday– Petersburg, Virginia– “The news of General Johnston falling back to Atlanta reached here on yesterday. I have but little or no fears that the Yankees will ever get down to where you are but I think that you will be pestered by our own soldiers, not that I think that they will harm you in any way except strolling about and begging for anything that is to eat and stealing your chickens, etc. I had almost as leave have the Yankees around my house as our own men except they will not insult ladies. Everything has remained quiet here since I last wrote, except the Yankees continue to shell the city and some little picket fighting. General Grant says the siege of Richmond has begun, if so we don’t know it. It will be like the little man hugging the big woman, he will have to besiege one side awhile and then the other. Tell me not that such an army as ours whose prayers ascend the throne of God day and night can ever by subdued or conquered. Our army is in good spirits and as far as I know, in good condition. Our brigade wants to get to Atlanta, if they must die in defense of their country they had rather fell in defense of their own native state but there is no hopes of our going as far as I know.” ~ Letter from Confederate soldier W.A. Stilwell to his wife Molly.

July 8– Friday– above Atlanta, Georgia– “I have been marching or ditching for the last two weeks day and night. I am now on the bank of a ditch. I am well at this time. Well, Sis, I have been in several tight places since I saw you. Last week we were marched five or six miles across the Chattahoochee River. We stayed there two days and then we marched a mile and formed a line of battle and fronted 10,000 Yankees, but they did not see us. Our cavalry fought them about one hour and had to run, and we had to leave quick and then we marched three miles back where we had to entrench ourselves. We commenced ditching Sunday evening but before we finished our ditch the Yankees come on us. There was some of the heaviest cannonading last night I ever heard yet. I said last night it was about sundown, just across the river. I don’t know what it was for, nor what damage was done. I reckon there was forty fired to the minute. The Yankees are . . . . not more than 12 or 14 miles from Atlanta. The weather is very hot and dry. You said Brother wanted me to write to him and let him know where we are. Tell him we are on the Chattahoochee, 12 miles from Atlanta, but I cannot tell how long we will stay here. We are almost without anything to eat. I have not had as much meat this week as I could eat in one day. I am hungry all the time and cannot get anything hardly to eat.” ~ Letter from a Confederate soldier to his sister.

 July 8– Friday– near Andersonville, Georgia– “When we were in sight of Camp Anderson on an embankment of ten or fifteen feet the engine ran off down the embankment and jerked all the cars off track, fortunately no one was killed, one lady was wounded by jumping out before the train stopped. The engine and wood box were broken all to pieces. Next box was turned nearly over, the others were merely thrown off track. I was never so badly frightened before. Johnston’s Army has fallen back to the Chattahoochee river. The Yankees have possession of Marietta and have burned the military Institute. The people think Johnston hasn’t a sufficient number of troops to make a fight. I hear that General Lee is driving Grant back. We have been very fearful that communication would be cut off from that army. I know the soldiers must be awfully tired and worn out marching and fighting so much, and so long. I forgot to say anything about the Yankee prison at Anderson. We were not nearer the Stockade than the depot which is three hundred yards distant I suppose, well perhaps it may have been farther but anyway we had a plain view of the stockade as we wished. There are from 30 to 35,000 thousand Yankees there now and more are coming in daily. We were told, from 100 to 150 die daily.” ~ Letters from Maggie Cone to her fiancé, Confederate soldier Alva Benjamin Spencer.

overcrowding at Andersonville

overcrowding at Andersonville

July 8– Friday– Havana, Cuba–The U S Counsel sends a warning to Secretary of State Seward that Confederate operatives in northern Mexico are planning to set up an independent country, with the aid of the French, creating an independent country between Mexico and the United States.

modern memorial where the Ikedaya Inn once stood

modern memorial where the Ikedaya Inn once stood

July 8– Friday– Kyoto, Japan– At the Ikedaya Inn special police move against a group of free-lance samurai, accusing them of plans to burn the city. In the struggle 8 samurai and 1 police officer are killed and 23 other samurai are arrested.

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